Winter 2012
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HALAL CONSUMER
9
food and farming future because it improves soil, protects
water, produces foods with higher nutritional value, focuses
on humane animal care, and provides a fair return to the
farmers,” says Lamonde.
ORGANIC — IS IT THE ONLY PATH?
An IFANCA halal-certified brand, Saffron Road, produced
by American Halal Company, although not certified as
organic, uses livestock and poultry that are 100% sustain-
ably farmed, vegetarian fed and harvested on family-owned
farms. Their ready-to-eat frozen dinners and simmer sauces
are also certified as halal, humanely raised and antibiotic
and hormone free.
According to Founder Adnan Durrani, “the key is not neces-
sarily to obtain an organic USDA rubber stamp, especially
since smaller family owned farms can’t afford the cost to get
official USDA Organic certification—yet some of these farms
follow better sustainable practices than some organic certi-
fied operators.”  What’s essential, he says, is to understand
the difference between mainstream organic factory farming
that involve mass quantity, versus sustainable farming that
prioritizes quality, mindful hand-slaughtering, and humane
animal welfare.
In February 2012, Saffron Road’s new Chicken Tikka Masala
was declared a “hit” by Supermarket Guru Phil Lempert
(
) on his popular “New Products
Hits & Misses” video review show. Lempert, one of America’s
leading consumer trend-watchers and analysts, gave the
entrée a score of 92 out of 100. Here’s what he had to say:
“This product is a HIT! A lot of the food media think that this
year is finally the time when halal goes mainstream. Simply
put, halal certification guarantees the humane treatment of
animals and respect for the land where our foods are grown.
This Chicken Tikka is very tender, with just the right amount
of Tandoori spices. Certified humane, no antibiotics and 100%
vegetarian feed are all attributes that you are going to be hear-
ing a lot more about.”
You Get What You Pay For:
1 Conventional factory farms produce items at a
faster rate to make profits quicker, focusing on
quantity, not premium quality.
2 Conventional farmers receive federal subsidies to
cover costs, organic farmers do not.
3 Tax Payers, not companies, pay for environmental
cleanups needed after using conventional pesti-
cides and fertilizers.
4 Unlike conventional factory farming where pesti-
cides and herbicides are used, organic farming is
much more labor and management intensive, thus
reflecting the true cost of growing food.
5 Durrani mentions a further expense: “Unlike
some food brands, we make sure every claim is
backed up by well-known and established third
party certifiers who have no affiliation whatso-
ever with any of our directors, employees, or
shareholders.” Although this is an added cost,
Durrani sees the value for Saffron Road in ethi-
cally building trust by giving consumers “comfort,
validation, and honest transparency.”
“A lot of the food media think that
this year is finally the time when
halal goes mainstream. Simply put,
halal certification guarantees the
humane treatment of animals and
respect for the land where our foods
are grown.” — Supermarket Guru,
Phil Lempert
Source: Saffron Road
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