Winter 2012
|
HALAL CONSUMER
35
DIET, EXERCISE & HEALTH —
THE CORNERSTONES OF GOOD HEALTH
d
As most fresh foods, including vegetables, grains and fruits contain
sodium naturally, the American Heart Association (AHA) recommends
limiting salt in meals, especially for people with high blood pressure.
Osteoporosis, which causes bones to become brittle and more likely
to break, is as much of an interest as heart health amongst women. A
serving of a low fat dairy product such as milk, cheese and yogurt is
recommended with every meal for a dose of calcium and vitamin D. A
bone mineral density test (BMD) can determine how much calcium and
other minerals are in various areas of one’s bones. The results will help
doctors predict the risk of bone fractures. Regular exercise, including
walking, also strengthens bones.
ENERGY NEEDS DETERMINE CALORIES REQUIRED
d
How many calories you need depends on how many you burn each day.
However, calorie counting alone will not result in healthy choices. Foods
may contain similar amounts of calories, but differ in nutrients. For
example, milk provides more calcium than bananas. If it is calcium you
need, choose milk and other low fat dairy products as meals. When it
comes to proteins, peanut butter has more protein than cereal. So if you
need protein, choose peanut butter, poultry or seafood.
Level of Activity
Calories Required Daily at 50+
Women
Men
Sedentary
1,600
2,000
Moderately Active 1,800
2,200–2,400
Regularly Active 2,000–2,200 2,400–2,800
FIBER AND WATER —
TWO SIDE OF THE SAME COIN
d
Constipation is common among aging seniors.
The antidote is getting adequate water, fiber
and physical activity. Fiber is found in fruits,
vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds and whole
grains. While fiber from actual food is better,
dietary fiber supplements from manufacturers
such as IFANCA halal certified Nutrilite
®
,
Abbott Nutrition
®
and USANA
®
are a great
alternative. The Dietary Guidelines for Ameri-
cans recommends 20-35 grams of fiber per day.
Any one of these options daily will suffice:
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1 cup of peas, beans or lentils with lunch
or dinner.
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A potato or apple with skin intact with
lunch or dinner.
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Whole fruits and vegetables instead of
juice with each meal.
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A slice of high fiber whole-grain bread or
a bowl of high fiber whole grain cereal
at breakfast, lunch or dinner.
Drinking plenty of water tackles dehydra-
tion and moves fiber through the intestines,
but water can also lower cholesterol and
blood glucose levels. The National Institute
of Medicine recommends about nine cups for
women and 13 cups for men daily, depend-
ing on health. Watermelon, cantaloupe,
cucumber, broccoli, lettuce, oranges and
tomatoes are also sources of water as are
milk, yogurt and fruit juices.
The senior years often mean having an over
active bladder. If you are going to be out and
about, get your fluids at home and not too
close to the time you need to hit the road.
Heading to some place new? Make it a point
to scope out restrooms as soon as you arrive.
“I restrict fluids when I go out and take a
urinal, towel and hand sanitizer with me
in case I cannot make it to the bathroom in
time,” says Mr. Mukhtar Abdullah, 60 from
Washington, DC. There are medications for
incontinence too. Ask your doctor.
IFANCA HALAL CERTIFIED RECOMMENDATIONS:
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Ensure from Abbott Labs
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Whey Protein fromUltimate Nutrition
& Davisco Foods
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Nutrilite Vitamins and Supplements
n
USANA Vitamins and Supplements
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