MANAGING THE INCREASING COST OF FOOD
“I am lucky and don’t have to spend a ton of money on grocer-
ies because of food allowances at work,” says Humaa Bhatti of
Cleveland, OH. “One thing I can think of is buying generic store
brands so you have more to spend on quality, healthy foods.”
“My family usually buys in bulk so it lasts longer,” says Amanda
Wagner from Brooklyn, NY.
Rabia Asghar of Rochester Hills, MI says her mother buys fruits
and veggies that are in season.
True, buying food on sale, in season and in bulk are always
sure-fire ways to cut grocery costs says Linda Watson, author
of
Wildly Affordable Organic: Eat Fabulous Food, Get Healthy, and
Save the Planet—all on $5 a Day or Less
. Watson, an adamant sup-
porter of eating and cooking organic, healthy foods, says smart
food choices can save your budget.
This could also be the time to buy into Community Supported
Agriculture (CSA). If possible, buy a share in a community-
supported organic farm and receive a week supply of produce
from spring until fall. Visit
for a list of commu-
nity-supported farms. As Agripreneur, Dr. Hisham Moharram,
owner of Good Tree Farm (
, a CSA,
points out, “(Joining) a CSA is part of a greater effort to con-
nect as a family and live a more wholesome life. The time
spent getting, preparing and consuming food together will
help us know and support each other better. Buying food
Author Linda Watson’s
Check List:
1. STOCK YOUR FREEZER
Ranked high on Watson’s list is stocking up on as many afford-
able, fresh fruits and veggies that you can get your hands on
and freezing them to last you through the winter. “One of the
great things you can do is feeding your freezer. Think about your
freezer as something you put produce into during the summer.
You can save a tremendous amount of money.”
2. BUY MORE SEASONAL FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
Strawberries, blueberries, peaches and squash are all consid-
ered summer produce whereas oranges, dates and Brussel
sprouts are great winter options. “If you have access to farm-
ers markets (www.
and
), often you will get the best local prices.”
3. CUT BACK ON MEAT
According to Luke Chandler, global head of agricultural com-
modity markets at Rabobank, a financial institution, in an
interview with Food Business News, “purchasers will switch
consumption from animal protein back to staple grains like
rice and wheat” which today are “30% cheaper than their peak
2008 prices.”
If you’re going to buy meat, Watson recommends buying chicken
instead of beef because it’s more affordable and takes less
energy to produce. “It takes 10 units of plant energy to create
one unit of beef energy. The drought is making [beef] prices
go up.”
HALAL CONSUMER
|
Winter 2012
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