from a farm typically means putting some time into
preparing it. It is, after all, typically raw and unpro-
cessed, uncooked food. If someone joins a CSA and
does not have time to prepare/cook the food, then
they are not going to have a good experience and will
feel they wasted their money.” You may want to ask
what veggies and fruits the CSA offers or be adven-
turous and willing to try new foods.
WILL THE WEATHER COOPERATE?
Market research shows the price of meat has been swiftly
increasing and will continue to rise through next year,
Buhr confirms. It’s hoped that Tropical Storm Isaac
might bring some relief to drought-stricken states.
However, Buhr believes too much moisture from rainfall
can also hurt crops more than help them. “Who knows
what happens tomorrow,” says Buhr. “I can’t predict the
weather, but I do know that our soil moisture conditions
across the crop growing region are worse than they’ve
been. If we don’t get some pretty substantial moisture
coming in before next year’s crop, we are in trouble
next year too.”
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Aysha Hussain is a New York-
based writer and producer. She has worked at NBC, CBS
and has written for newspapers and magazines such as
Newsday, DiversityInc and Muslim Girl Magazine.
~
THE SODA TAX DEBATE
~
It may not be a natural disaster, but obesity in the United
States has rapidly become a national epidemic. Politicians around
the country, most notably Mayor Michael Bloomberg of New
York City, in an effort to curb obesity has implemented a
ban on the sale of large sodas in restaurants and movie the-
aters. Outside of New York, there are already 30 states
including Texas and Iowa, who impose a sales tax on purchases
of sweetened drinks. As of this writing, come November,
Richmond, California may become the first city to tax busi-
nesses one penny for every ounce of soda sold. The idea is to
dissuade consumers from reaching for a fizzy drink and opting
for fewer calories. These moves have stirred quite the debate.
Do you believe soda being taxed will be a deterrent to flavored
beverage consumption? Will it put a dent in our waistlines?
4. CUT BACK ON PROCESSED FOODS
The one advantage to buying processed foods like cereal is that there
are always coupons available, but “if you don’t buy processed food,
you’re saving so much money. Simply, the more pure you can eat, the
better .” But buy only as much as you will reasonably use. The longer
fresh produce sits, the more nutrients it loses.
5. CHOOSE STURDY FOODS
Foods like cabbage, carrots, onions and butternut squash all hold up
well. These “sturdy” foods cost less, transport well and don’t spoil
very quickly.
6. SCRIMP VS. SPLURGE
Develop a “scrimp vs. splurge list.” You’re standing in the condiment
aisle and contemplating whether to buy olive oil or balsamic vinegar.
Sure you’re on a budget, but don’t overdo it and know that it’s okay to
make certain exceptions on food purchases.
Winter 2012
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HALAL CONSUMER
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